: Vol 36(1) - 'All shall be equal before the law'

Vol 36(1) - 'All shall be equal before the law'

Christian Bonadio

Our cover image was captured by Christian Bonadio, and amateur photographer more at home in the world of corporate recrutiment than in the darkroom. Here he explains the inspiration for his photograph.

Visiting South Africa for the football World Cup last year, my cousin and I took a hop-on, hop-off bus tour around Cape Town. We had stopped in the judicial and governmental region of the city and, walking past the court and government buildings, saw historic landmarks that showed what living in South Africa was like during apartheid. There were benches marked 'white only' and 'black only'. On these benches there were thoughts on what defined a Black and a White citizen and some facts as to the laws. As we continued to walk and imagine what life was like for black (or perceived black) citizens, we saw this painting on the wall. The image became, in my eyes, a message to the powers-that-be regarding the injustice that apartheid law was to the people of South Africa — made stronger because of the era in which it was painted. I felt the irony of the painting, and the mask that 'lady liberty' wore, was an incredibly symbolic image which depicted the many tragedies that had been suffered.

Our time in South Africa, and being exposed to images which depicted a slice of the pain inflicted on the people at that time, grabbed me all at once. Despite it not being overly beautiful when compared to other photos that we took, this is one of my favourites.

All shall be equal before the law, Christian BonadioAll shall be equal before the law
© 2011 Christian Bonadio
The featured graffiti is part of a series call the 'Freedom Charter' by the artist Faith47. You can see more of her work at www.faith47.com

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